Au revoir Maria, and a Friday of goodbyes

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Someday remind me to tell you how they cut round cakes in Italy.

I’m discovering that Mondays are hello days and Fridays are goodbye days at language school. Today before class it was time to eat goodbye cake for Maria, one of our dearest teachers. After class it was time to sing goodbye karaoke for Maria. Before dinner it was time to drink goodbye apperitivi for Maria. However, some students are finishing their classes and leaving as well, so in between goodbyes to Maria we shared a lunchtime goodbye with Thomas, a dinner goodbye with Martino and a digestivo goodbye with Flavia.

Back at my Perugia home, in between goodbyes to people I said goodbye to my room and hello to Thomas’ former room. Though my old room was just fine, Thomas’ has an extraordinary view and a bathroom of its own. Now I can set out my toothbrush and toothpaste just how I please.

I also had time for a walking exploration of Perugia, and I headed to one side of the mountain on which Perugia is located, walking downhill to a section of churches and smaller apartment buildings. As I say hello to Perugia I’m starting to realize that what makes Perugia unique is the relatively large size of its Centro Historic in proportion to the relatively small size of its population. Wikipedia lists Perugia as having a population of just 168,000, which puts it on par with Vancouver, Washington or Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Perugia is infinitely more charming and complex than either American city, I suspect due to the fact that its population has been fairly large over a many centuries, unlike our American towns that sprout and grow overnight. I’m sure it has its sad and seedy areas, too, but so far there is none of that sprawling American car-desert with vast parking lots and superhighways. Thank you, Italy.

After a day of saying goodbye I said goodbye to the final goodbye party at about midnight and headed to my new room. Monday is Italian Independence Day, so that means a three day weekend, followed by some new people to greet when we’re back in school on Tuesday.

Now is the time

New Italian Words: “Apperitivo,” “Digestivo”

Wine tasting with (clockwise from left) Maria, io, Tamila, Patricia, Chris.

Working hard with (clockwise from left) Maria, io, Tamila, Patricia, Chris.

My daily life has a new normal. When the sun bathes my bed with yellow light I wake up, usually at around 6:00. I check my email in bed and perhaps write a blog post while I wait for others to awaken. When I hear them stir I either get up for my shower or head out to the dining room for breakfast. This involves Corn Flakes, Nutella®, a piece of Italian pound cake, a cafe latte, and conversation with Thomas and Flavia. Once I’ve eaten and showered, it’s back to my room to prepare for class.

At about 10:30 I walk down, down, down from the Centro Historico to Comitato Linguistico, my language school, which is in a pleasant part of town near the modern bus station. There I have a class with my teacher, Maria*, and this week just one other student, Patricia of Holland. The class is exclusively in Italian, though both Patricia and I often slip into Spanish to help us figure out vocabulary or to compare verb conjugations. We begin with review of homework, then work through the study book, then have some vocabulary lessons and conversation. Maria ends the class with a homework assignment, and then students from all the classes often head out to lunch somewhere nearby or at the Centro Historico. After lunch, it’s individual study time or blogging time or time to tour this interesting city.

Three arches lead the way to a so far unexplored part of town.

Three arches lead the way to a so far unexplored part of town.

Yesterday I really got down to studying. I went to the bookstore and bought some sticky tabs so I could mark the reference sections of my book, and then for a couple of hours I sat down with my numbers and with verb conjugations to make sure I have a good foundation in Italian.

Almost every afternoon or evening Comitato has an optional excursion for the students. Yesterday a group of us gathered at 19:00 — military time is standard here — and walked to a section of town I’d never seen before, very near a prominent set of three arches, similar to a gate in a city wall. Maria** was our leader, and I and three others sat down to taste Umbrian wines — a prosecco, a white and a red. We must’ve still looked thirsty after only three bottles, so the proprietor had pity on us and brought out some of his artisanal limoncello to help us out. This is hard work, being an Italian student.

Always another fascinating neighborhood to visit.

Always another fascinating neighborhood to visit.

I have a standing date back at Graziella’s each night at 21:00 for dinner, so I excused myself from our wine tasting and walked back to Piazza Republica, admittedly with my head spinning a little bit from the wines. Back in the apartment, Luigi, Graziella’s son, who has dinner with us each night, must’ve noticed things weren’t quite normal. “Apperitivo? Si?” he asked. “Digestivo. Si,” I responded.

Until I looked them up just now I didn’t realize that I got the vocabulary just a little bit wrong. “Apperitivo” is the Italian word for a small taste of low-sugar liquor that gets your stomach ready for dinner. “Digestivo,” it turns out, is not the word for “wine-tasting extravaganza with fellow Italian students,” but simply means the kind of liquor you drink just after dinner to help your digestive tract enjoy the food you’ve just eaten.

As I think about it, all this common sense gastronomic wisdom seems to have succeeded in making Italy quite the relaxed and stylish country. It reminds me of a video Maria shared in class yesterday.

In spite of my misuse of the words, Luigi seemed to make sense of my vocabulary, perhaps due to the somewhat flushed look on my face. Soon, he, Thomas and I were talking to each other in French, Luigi’s second language and a strong language as well for Thomas. It was an interesting exercise to pull out my high school French, which I last studied in 1974. Still, my French is a little better than my Spanish, and both are much better than my Italian. The little exercise over dinner is a reminder of what it is like to live in modern Europe, where it is assumed that a well-educated person will be competent in slipping in and out of a few languages over dinner.

As much as I was enjoying the conversation in French, I excused myself immediately after dinner to head to my room. I begged off the dessert Graziella had prepared and climbed right into bed, where I fell asleep almost instantly — the result of a busy day of studying Italian here in Perugia.

Italy, brought to you by Nutella®.

Italy, brought to you by Nutella®.

*Maria insists that I correct an earlier entry in which I note incorrectly that she is 38 years old. She is only 31, as should be obvious.

**Not the 38-year old, but the 31-year old Maria.